Pedodontics (Children's Dentistry)

 

del mar dentistry Children generally develop their teeth before birth. Eruption starts at about six months, usually with the appearance of the lower incisors, and is complete by about two-and-a-half years. The tables below will show an estimated chronology of tooth development:

Eruption Dates for Baby Teeth


Tooth

Lower

Upper

Central Incisor

6 1/2 months

7 1/2 months

Lateral Incisor

7 months

8 months

First Molar

12 - 16 months

12 - 16 months

Canine

16 - 20 months

16 - 20 months

Second Molar

20 - 30 months

20 - 30 months



Erruption Dates for Permanent Teeth

Tooth

Lower

Upper

Central Incisor

6 - 7 years

7 - 8 years

Lateral Incisor

7 - 8 years

8 - 9 years

Canine

9 - 10 years

11 - 12 years

1st Premolar

10 - 12 years

10 -11 years

2nd Premolar

11 - 12 years

10 - 12 years

1st Molar

6 - 7 years

6 - 7 years

2nd Molar

11 - 13 years

12 - 13 years

3rd Molar

17 - 21 years

17 - 21 years



RESTORATIONS

Deciduous (baby) teeth are different from permanent teeth not only in their size but also in their anatomy. Deciduous teeth have larger pulp chambers, shorter and more curved roots, more curved crowns and a thinner enamel coating than permanent teeth. It is for these reasons as well as their short life span that they may be restored differently from permanent teeth. Deciduous teeth tend to develop decays easier and faster, but diet may have a direct effect on that. Basic cavities are treated in the same fashion in the early stages as permanent teeth. If the baby teeth have a short life span remaining the dentist may decide to temporarily fill the teeth to maintain a healthy chewing function and space for the permanent teeth to erupt. In some instances the decay front may have extended as far as the pulp (nerve) chamber. In the case of permanent teeth this is an inevitable root canal. In the case of deciduous teeth, because of their high regeneration coefficient (large nerve size allowing better healing ability) one of the following procedures may be performed:

Pulpotomy: The superficial affected nerve is removed with a sterile diamond bur and medications are placed over the nerve with an intermediate restorative material. In some cases the permanent restoration may be placed.
Pulpectomy: The entire nerve in the pulp chamber is removed and the remaining nerve in the canals is medicated and sealed. The tooth is then restored.
Apexification: This procedure is done on newly erupted permanent teeth of children. The entire pulp chamber along with the nerve inside the canals of the roots are removed. Since it can take 2-3 years before the root formation is complete from the time teeth erupt, the newly forming teeth may not have gone through full formation of their roots and it's apex. In order to facilitate root apex formation the roots are filled with Calcium Hydroxide, which over time are placed with dentine and cementum, the natural root constituents.
Extraction: If the nerve of the deciduous tooth is damaged to the point that an abscess has formed under the tooth, extraction may be the only option. The reason is to protect the permanent underlying tooth bud from any damage caused by the infection. In certain instances if the process of eruption of the permanent tooth is not within the near future, a space maintainer may be used after extraction. This device prevents the adjacent teeth from moving into the area where the permanent tooth is to erupt into.




Locations:


Del Mar Dental Arts Office

12750 Carmel Country Rd
Suite 213
San Diego, CA 92130


(858) 481-8107



Fifth Avenue Dental Arts Office

450 A St. Suite 200
San Diego, CA 92101

(619) 233-3338